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Killinghall Moor Country Park is a 25-acre area of parkland in Harrogate, comprising a beautiful mix of woodland, heathland, and open grass areas. There are many wild spaces in the park, making it popular with both wildlife and lovers of wildlife alike.

The park is a conservation area that attracts a variety of native birds and animals. Killinghall Moor is much valued as a relaxing space by residents and visitors alike. There are a total of six football pitches available, as well as a pavilion including shower and changing facilities.

There are no formal planting schemes in the park. As it is a conservation area, where residents and visitors can enjoy the beauty of it native birds and wildlife, the trees and plants are scattered throughout, just as nature intended.

You reach the park via the main entrance signposted from Jenny Field Drive. For disabled visitors, much of the site is accessible from the main footpaths. The footpaths can be accessed via the main entrance off Barberry Close.

Harrogate Fake Festival was first launched four years ago as part of a nationwide music festival franchise, and was first held nearer to Harrogate town centre on the Stray, not far from York Place. However, as of 2019 it has been held in Killinghall Moor Country Park, situated between Jennyfield and Penny Pot Lane.

The borders of the country park are not well defined, with additional football fields, Oakdale Golf Club and farmland nearby. Killinghall Moor has no heather and looks particularly green. Unlike what is usually characterised as moorland, Killinghall Moor does not feature low-growing vegetation in acidic soil, making it a moor in name only.

Killinghall Moor Conservation Group has been formed to protect the area around Killinghall Moor Country Park from development. It is a small group of local advocates for a particularly cherished area of Harrogate’s green space.

Killinghall Moor Country Park is not far from the A61 between Derby and Thirsk, and has Oak Beck running right past, a tributary of the River Nidd.